Study Guides and Tools For Driver’s Ed Exams 

parallel parking for you driving testThis is for the new drivers out there.

Your driver’s education exam is coming up, and you want to get on the road as soon as you can. You don’t want to have to retake the test. Getting in some practice before the exam can be the difference between passing and failing.

There are so many rules to the road. How to park properly. Driving in tough conditions. When and how to make certain turns. If you’re trying to absorb all this information for the first time, it can be a bit intimidating.

Practicing for the exam not only better preps you for the test — it makes you a safer driver as well. Here at Fried Rogers Goldbergwe want you to be as prepared as you can be when you’re behind the wheel. So let’s take this time to better prepare you for your driver’s ed exam.

 Tips, Notes and Where to Practice

There are some great websites that offer tips, online flashcards and practice tests we highly recommend you try a few times before taking your driver’s ed exam.

At Quizlet, you’ll find a great study guide broken up into dozens of categories. Also on the site, you can find an excellent, in-depth flashcard program that’s fun and easy-to-use. Their practice test is also great. Quizlet’s driver’s ed program also features “Scatter,” a unique, mix-and-match-style game that helps make sure you know the terms you’ll be asked about on the test.

DriversEd.com has its own game to test your knowledge on road signs and more. A high enough score could earn you a discount on one of their courses.

The site IDriveSafely.com also has some fantastic practice course options. Though they cost money, they’re worth the $10 to $25 if you’re serious about passing your test and becoming a safe driver.

Need some quick tips? We have collected some of the most useful bits from the websites above and arranged them into a list below. Even if you think you already know what you need to pass your test, looking through these rules and laws of the road will only make the road a safer place.

Parking on Hills

  • Facing DOWN a hill: put car in park; put on emergency brake; turn steering wheel to the RIGHT.
  • Facing UP a hill: put car in park; put on emergency brake; turn steering wheel to the LEFT.

The Three Point Turn

  • Make sure the car is in drive. Cut your wheels to the left. Turn your blinker on. Check to make sure it’s safe to turn and slowly drive.
  • Put your car in reverse. Cut the wheel to the right. Check your visuals again. Slowly back up.
  • Put the car in drive again. Cut the wheel to the left. Check your visuals one more time and release the brake slowly. Drive safely.

Parallel Parking

Here’s a detailed guide on how to parallel park. Or you can follow these five steps from our friends at Quizlet:

  1. Before parking, slow down at least two car lengths ahead of time. Be one foot away from the parked car.
  2. When pulled up to the parked car, match your B column (the bar on car bottom) to the back end of the parked car. Put your car in reverse and cut your wheel to the parked car. Slowly angle your car away from the parked car. Match the side view mirror of your left corner to the parked car.
  3. Cut your wheels to the left. Line up your front right corner with the parked car’s left corner. Line up your front right corner to the parked car’s back left corner.
  4. At a half foot or less, stop your car when the side mirror is just before the center point of the parked car’s corner to the street side. When the parked car is one foot away, line up the side mirrors. When the back right corner is over the curb or touching, put your car into drive, cut the wheels right and ride your brakes.
  5. Park it.

Driving in Hazardous Weather

  • driving in the snow tipsFog: Using your high beams will reduce your visibility and your ability to judge distance. If you don’t have fog lights, simply slow down and widen your following distance.
  • Heavy Rain: Use your wipers, turn on both your front and rear defrosters, and SLOW DOWN. Use low beams if possible when your wipers are on and always be alert and ready to react.
  • Snow: Remember to clean off your tail lights, wipers and headlights. Reduce your speed, do not crowd the center line and always brake cautiously and gently while widening your following distance.

If You Do Skid…

This can happen in any condition: ice, rain, sleet, even on a clear, dry day if there are hazards on the road’s surface. When you feel your car starting to skid, turn in the direction of the skid and let off the gas. When you get your car under control, apply your brakes SLOWLY and get back on the road or to a safe area.

Under the Hood

  • Tune Up: Help keep your car in good shape and keep pollution down.
  • Battery: What provides electricity to the vehicle.
  • Jumper Cables: What help start the car when your battery is dead.
  • Oil: Keeps the pistons in your engine running smooth and keeps friction down.
  • Oil Filter: Prevents dirt from getting into your engine.
  • Anti-Freeze: Keeps the engine running cool; stops it from overheating.
  • Washer Fluid: The spray that cleans your car’s windshield wiper blades and windshield.
  • Steering Fluid: Helps the steering wheel turn easier.
  • Transmission Fluid: Helps shift the vehicle’s gears.
  • Tire Pressure: Should be checked every two to three weeks.

Who Are We?

Fried Rogers Goldberg is one of the country’s preeminent truck accident law firms. We care about the safety of all drivers on Georgia’s roads and beyond.

We have a proven reputation and record of success that is unparalleled in truck accident law. We have been nationally recognized for our dedication and results. Though we specialize in truck accident law, we practice all matters of civil litigation. If you would like to discuss a possible case with us, call us at 404-591-1800 or contact us online.

One Response to “Study Guides and Tools For Driver’s Ed Exams ”

  1. Joy Butler

    I think that it’s a great idea to use online flash cards to study for your written exam for your drivers’ license. It could be useful to find cards from someone who has already taken the exam so that you can ask them if they had all of the information. It could also be a good idea to seek out the drivers’ education instructor at your local high school for advice.

    Reply

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